American Man Mocked After He Taunts Singapore Newspaper for Using British English

Don Lovell is a consultant from Atlanta, Georgia. For some reason, he decided to take issue with the Straits Times’ use of British English on Twitter and would not quit when corrected. Out of embarrassment, perhaps, he removed his Twitter account.

Earlier this afternoon, the Singaporean publication tweeted out a report about a driver who was arrested in an alleged drunk, errrr “drink” driving case.

Annoyed by the usage of British standards, good ‘ol Lovell insisted that the phrase that should have been used was “drunk driving”.

Not to be outdone by a damn dictionary definition, Lovell said that ST — a newspaper that’s been around since 1845 during the British colonial rule with a British man as its founding editor — should actually be using American English instead.

Lovell then questioned the paper’s understanding of linguistics. A sincere query posed to an entity that’s been around since before he was even born.

“You don’t understand linguistics, do you? Where English comes from? Oh, that’s good. How about where English flourishes?”

To see how other Twitter users responded to his tirade, read more about the story on Coconuts Singapore here.

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Bus Company Deletes Facebook Complaint on Bedbugs; Passenger Reposts and Story Goes Viral

A woman traveling by coach complained about bedbugs on the bus, complains about it on the bus company’s Facebook page, where it got deleted. She went ahead to share it on her own Facebook account, and it went viral, prompting others to share about their bad experiences.

This was then picked up by mass media, and the company said that it was investigating.

The bus was traveling from Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia, to Singapore.

Administrative executive Natalie Yap, 29, wrote on Facebook detailing her unpleasant experience onboard Starmart Express’ “first class massage coach” on Monday (Dec 26), and demanded that the company provide a full refund for her trip and medical expenses.

The Singapore permanent resident, who was in the Malaysian capital for the Christmas holidays, also uploaded photos of her bites and the bedbugs in the Facebook post, which went viral with close to 9,000 shares.

My suggestion to address complaints on commercial Facebook pages is:

  1. Respond directly to the post. Never delete it.
  2. Apologize for the inconvenience and bad experience.
  3. State that the company is aware of the complaint and that a private message has been sent to the complainer to obtain more details.
  4. Assign a specific employee to investigate.
  5. In the private message, request for the complainer to get in touch with said employee. Provide the employee’s full name, his/her direct phone number and an email address. If there is a ticket number to log the complaint, provide it.
  6. If the complainer refuses to contact the company privately and continues to rant on the Facebook page, state that it’s not company policy to address complaints publicly because of customer privacy issues, and then reiterate that an employee will be ready to address the complaint via phone or email.

Read more about it at The Straits Times.

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Undergrads Disciplined After Freshmen Orientation Misbehavior Went Viral on Facebook

In July, a Facebook post about inappropriate behavior at the National University of Singapore (NUS) freshmen orientation camp surfaced. It became viral quickly, and school officials and the Singapore Ministry of Education investigated.

This month, it was reported that at least 14 undergraduates have been disciplined.

In July, The New Paper reported about how orientation games for freshmen were getting more risque, with one even simulating rape. The report triggered a public outcry.

Acting Minister for Education (Higher Education and Skills) Ong Ye Kung called some of the risque acts “reprehensible” in a Facebook post on July 27.

Student-organised orientation activities were suspended on July 29, except for several events such as the NUS Students’ Union’s Rag and Flag activities.

This came after a video was posted online showing freshmen being dunked repeatedly in a pond in Sheares Hall. The suspension was gradually lifted from Aug 8.

The matter was later raised in Parliament on Aug 16, when Mr Ong said the inappropriate activities are not widespread, and happen “when staff and faculty are not watching, and when some students decide to deviate from approved plans”.

Read more about it at The Straits Times.

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