British Museum Criticized for Saying Asian Names Are Confusing

During an interactive Twitter session #AskACurator, a curator was asked about accessibility to a diverse range of people, to which the reply was: “Sometimes Asian names can be confusing, so we have to be careful about using too many.”

That tweet caused an uproar, and British Museum tried to clarify that statement, but dug itself into a deeper hole:

Eventually, they decided to apologize:

Read more about it at The Guardian.

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Professor Fired After Calling Hurricane Harvey “Instant Karma”

Visiting Assistant Professor Kenneth Storey at the University of Tampa had described Hurricane Harvey as “instant karma” for Texans. It caused an uproar, and he deleted the post.

The University issued a statement condemning his remarks:

The University of Tampa on Monday night posted a statement on Facebook condemning Storey’s comments and “the sentiment behind them,” but noted they were posted to a private account and “not made within his capacity as a faculty member.”

That statement made no reference to Storey’s future role with the university — but, in another release Tuesday, the university said Storey “has been relieved of his duties at UT, and his classes will be covered by other sociology faculty.”

Read more about it at The Orlando Sentinel.

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County Official Facebook Ban of Citizen Ruled Unconstitutional

A county official in Virginia banned a local on her Facebook page after the latter accused the official of nepotism.

The ban was ruled unconstitutional on the basis of the First Amendment:

Phyllis Randall, chair of the Loudon County, Virginia, Board of Supervisors, banned Brian Davison from her Facebook page for just 12 hours. But according to a federal judge in Alexandria, that brief banishment in February 2016 was enough to violate Davison’s First Amendment rights…

… [U.S. District Judge James] Cacheris rejected Randall’s contention that her Facebook page “is merely a personal website that she may do with as she pleases.” He notes that she and her chief of staff created it shortly before she took office, that it it lists her official position and contact information, and that she uses it primarily for official purposes such as describing the supervisors’ work, implementing their policies, documenting her appearances as a representative of the county government, and communicating with her constituents.

Read more about it on Reason.

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